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December 31, 2007

Business intelligence roadmap

Filed under: Uncategorized — stefangeorgescu @ 8:28 am

Business data and business intelligence features in Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 enable you to connect to business data in databases and line-of-business applications, display data as information in Web Parts and SharePoint lists, find and share that information with other users, and perform business analytics and measure progress against key performance indicators. Successfully integrated business data enables business managers to increase their knowledge about business processes and improve those processes over time. This roadmap provides links to Web articles, white papers, training, blog entries, and tools to guide you in implementing the business data and business intelligence features of your site based on Office SharePoint Server 2007.The resources presented on this page are organized in the sequence in which you should implement the business data and business intelligence features of your site:

1. Connect to business data.

2. Display business data in lists and Web Parts.

3. Create business data sites.

4. Find and share business data.

Before you begin

Before you implement business data and business intelligence features in your SharePoint site, review the following overview topics, which describe Office SharePoint Server 2007 business data and business intelligence capabilities and customization options that are available to site architects, designers, creators, and developers:

Plan for business intelligence

Introduction to Excel Services and Excel Web Access

Connect to business data by using data connection libraries

You connect to business data in two ways. First, you connect to a database by using a data connection library. Next, you can analyze data in a data connection library by using Excel Calculation Services and Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Analysis Services by using Web Parts that are displayed in a business data dashboard.

To configure an Excel Services connection to a data library, you perform the following steps:

1. Add a trusted file location.

2. Configure the Single Sign-On service.

3. Add a trusted data provider.

4. Add a trusted data connection library.

For information about techniques for configuring Excel Services connections to data connection libraries, see the following resources:

Plan data connection management

Plan Excel Services security

Plan external data connections for Excel Services

White paper: Excel Services step-by-step guides

Add a trusted file location

A trusted file location is a document library, network path, or Web site configured as a trusted repository for workbooks that are accessible by using Excel Services. For information about adding a trusted file location, see the following resource:

Add a trusted file location

Configure the Single Sign-On service

Single sign-on authentication enables users to access multiple system resources without having to be authenticated more than once. To access workbooks using Excel Services, the Single Sign-On service must be enabled and configured with the correct Excel Services credentials. For information about techniques for configuring the Single Sign-On service for Excel Services, see the following resources:

Start the Single Sign-On service

Manage settings for single sign-on

Add a trusted data provider

Trusted data providers are external databases that Excel Services is explicitly configured to trust when processing data connections in workbooks. For information about techniques for adding a trusted data provider for Excel Services, see the following resource:

Add a trusted data provider

Add a trusted data connection library

A trusted data connection library is a data connection library that the Excel Services administrator has determined is safe to access Office data connection (.odc) files. The .odc files are used to centrally manage connections to external data sources that have already been configured as trusted data providers. For information about techniques for adding a trusted data provider for Excel Services, see the following resource:

Add a trusted data connection library

Connect to data in line-of-business applications

You can also connect to data in line-of-business applications and then display that content in lists and Web Parts. Line-of-business applications are registered in the Business Data Catalog by importing application definitions in the form of authored XML files that contain authentication, authorization, and metadata information about each application and some of its selected business data types (or entities). For information about techniques for connecting to data in line-of-business applications by using the Business Data Catalog, see the following resource:

Business Data Catalog Information Center (developer)

Configure security for the Business Data Catalog

Before you can connect to applications and entities by using the Business Data Catalog, you must configure authentication and authorization for the Business Data Catalog. For information about techniques for configuring security for the Business Data Catalog, see the following resources:

Configure access to business data

Business Data Catalog authentication (developer)

Business Data Catalog authorization (developer)

Create application definitions

For each line-of-business application with data that you want to use in your deployment, you must author an XML file that contains metadata about the application and the entities of that application that you are about to import. For information about techniques for authoring metadata, see the following resources:

Business Data Catalog: Metadata Model (developer)

Authoring metadata (developer)

Import application definitions

After you author an XML file with the metadata for a business application, the Business Data Catalog administrator must import the application definition. This enables the imported data to be used in SharePoint lists, Web Parts, and sites. For information about techniques for importing application definitions, see the following resources:

How to: Import an Application Definition from XML (developer)

Register business applications in the Business Data Catalog

•Microsoft Business Data Catalog Definition Editor, included with the August 2007 update to the SharePoint Server 2007 SDK: Software Development Kit (developer)

Design business data actions

Each imported entity for a line-of-business application in the Business Data Catalog has a default action associated with the entity called View Profile. Whenever an instance of the entity appears, a View Profile link appears. The target URL of the View Profile link includes a list of properties or data fields for the entity. The list uses a template that can be configured by the Business Data Catalog administrator. The View Profile action can also be modified by changing the target URL completely.

Other business data actions can be configured by associating a label for the action with a target URL. The target URL can be a simple page or a highly complex site customized with rich business data.

For information about techniques for configuring business data profiles and designing business data actions, see the following resources:

Create or customize a business data profile page (information worker)

Plan for business data profiles

Plan business data actions

Display business data in lists and Web Parts

After you have made connections to business data by using data connection libraries and the Business Data Catalog, information workers with the correct permissions to Business Data Catalog services can use that business data in lists and Web Parts.

The Web Parts used to display business data include:

•Business Data Item Web Part

•Business Data List Web Part

•Business Data Related List Web Part

•Business Data Actions Web Part

•Business Data Item Builder Web Part

The Web Parts used to analyze business intelligence include:

•Key Performance Indicator (KPI) Web Part

•Excel Web Access Web Part

•WSRP Web Part

•IView Web Part (for SAP)

•Report Viewer Web Part (for SQL Server 2005 Reporting Services)

Additional Web Parts are used to connect Web Parts or to filter the data displayed in Web Parts.

For information about techniques for displaying business data in lists and Web Parts, see the following resources:

Business data in sites, lists, and libraries (information worker)

Work with business data in SharePoint lists (information worker)

Web Parts and Web Part Pages (developer)

Data Sources (developer)

Data Views (developer)

Web Parts (How Do I… in Windows SharePoint Services) (developer)

Working with ASP.NET 2.0 Web Parts and Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 (developer)

Creating a Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 Web Part Using Visual Studio 2005 Extensions (developer)

Creating Web Parts in Windows SharePoint Services (developer)

Solutions and Web Part Packages (developer)

Target audiences (Office SharePoint Server) (information worker)

Plan business data Web Parts

Business Data Web Parts (developer)

Work with filter Web Parts (Office SharePoint Server) (information worker)

Excel Web Access Web Part summary (information worker)

Create and publish Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) (information worker)

Resources for Interoperability with Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007

Integrating Office SharePoint Server 2007 and SAP

Smart Clients: Build A Windows Forms Control To Consume And Render

Create business data sites

Business data in lists and Web Parts is gathered together into sites that use a mix of different lists and Web Parts that often interact and share data. Some Web Parts display data in list form, whereas other Web Parts enable analysis of business intelligence or key performance indicators.

Types of sites that commonly use business data include:

Profiles   Each entity has a default View Profile action, with the target URL being a business data profile page. The profile page can be anything from a simple list of properties using the standard business data profile template, to a highly customized business data application.

Dashboards   The dashboard site template includes Excel Web Access Web Parts, and can be customized with additional Web Parts.

Personalization sites   These sites use a specialized filter Web Part that displays information based upon the identity of the current user. Personalization sites often include detailed business data that display information using this filter. Personalization sites are often linked from the My Site navigation bar.

•Other site templates, including the main portal site template, can be customized by adding one or more business data or business intelligence Web Parts.

For information about techniques for creating business data sites, see the following resources:

Display business data on a SharePoint site (information worker)

ASP.NET Web Pages (developer)

ASP.NET Web Parts Pages (developer)

ASP.NET Web Server Controls (developer)

Plan Web pages

Create a publishing page layout (developer)

Customize a publishing page layout (developer)

Pages in Office SharePoint Server 2007 (developer)

Introduction to customizing pages by using Web Parts (Windows SharePoint Services) (information worker)

Customizing pages by using Web Parts (Windows SharePoint Services) (information worker)

Customizing pages by using Web Parts (Office SharePoint Server) (information worker)

Creating and editing pages (Office SharePoint Server) (information worker)

Share Excel 2007 worksheets and KPIs by using dashboards (information worker)

Add a report to a dashboard (information worker)

Connect data in Web Parts (information worker)

Work with filter Web Parts (information worker)

Excel Services: Connections and properties (information worker)

Holiday break: The next newsletter is scheduled to hit your inbox mid-January. Have a great break and a Happy New Year.

We are all taking a break over the next week and you’ll see us blogging again next year ) We all hope you have a fabuluos holiday and a great 2008!:)

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